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Best selling scooters in Italy

Last post 11-23-2011 01:35 AM by bunnybash. 33 replies.
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  • 11-16-2011 01:19 PM In reply to

    Re: Best selling scooters in Italy

    Good post Emil lo.

    Surprised that the Honda SH300i still tops the list. Such a rarity here in Oz. 

  • 11-16-2011 02:42 PM In reply to

    • jonners
    • Top 150 Contributor
    • Joined on 12-13-2010
    • Perth (western 'burbs)
    • Posts 248

    Re: Best selling scooters in Italy

    they like big wheeled scooters in Europe for one reason - they are better than small wheeled scoots in every possible way. I think the reason they aren't so popular here is probably just fashion. It's a pity becuse if more people here gave them a try, they'd realise just how much better they are.

    Vespa PX 200 (black)

    Piaggio Fly 150 (white)

    Suzuki Vstrom (dl650) (red)
  • 11-16-2011 06:48 PM In reply to

    Re: Best selling scooters in Italy

     The 10443 Australian sales includes 50s which are a separate category in Italy makes you relies how small Australian market is 

    Si ‘Thi’ later
  • 11-16-2011 07:32 PM In reply to

    • jonners
    • Top 150 Contributor
    • Joined on 12-13-2010
    • Perth (western 'burbs)
    • Posts 248

    Re: Best selling scooters in Italy

    isn't it the 8th largest economy in the world? It's a big deal. Exactly why it will be bad news if their whole economy crumbles!

    Vespa PX 200 (black)

    Piaggio Fly 150 (white)

    Suzuki Vstrom (dl650) (red)
  • 11-19-2011 11:46 AM In reply to

    Re: Best selling scooters in Italy

     Since I removed and inspected the variator on my Piaggio X7 evo 300 (6,000kms) it's taken the edge off my enthusiasm too - what a load of rubbish! Made by TGB according to the stamp on the outer cover. If you don't like the truth Piaggio then lift your game! 

  • 11-19-2011 03:46 PM In reply to

    Re: Best selling scooters in Italy

    tonyr:

     Since I removed and inspected the variator on my Piaggio X7 evo 300 (6,000kms) it's taken the edge off my enthusiasm too - what a load of rubbish! Made by TGB according to the stamp on the outer cover. If you don't like the truth Piaggio then lift your game! 

     

    Tony,

    What is rubbish? The quality of the variator?

    Or the fact that an Italian scooter has a Taiwanese made variator? 

    If the latter. Why would Piaggio go to the effort of reinventing the wheel. Probably has Japanese sparkplug as well Wink  

    As they list Piaggio 850 seperately from Piaggio 850 scooter chances are that the Mana variator is also made by TGBSurprise

     

  • 11-19-2011 07:24 PM In reply to

    • emil_io
    • Top 100 Contributor
    • Joined on 03-16-2011
    • Melbourne, Victoria
    • Posts 323

    Re: Best selling scooters in Italy

    tonyr:

     Since I removed and inspected the variator on my Piaggio X7 evo 300 (6,000kms) it's taken the edge off my enthusiasm too - what a load of rubbish! Made by TGB according to the stamp on the outer cover. If you don't like the truth Piaggio then lift your game! 

    That's interesting...I didn't know that Piaggio were using components in their Italian made scoots from Taiwanese manufacturers. Do they use them in the Vespa's too? Are you sure it's made by TGB? If it is the case, I think it goes to show that if Piaggio are using them, the Taiwanese must be making some decent quality stuff!

     

    Kymco Like 125

    Vespa PX 200
  • 11-19-2011 08:08 PM In reply to

    Re: Best selling scooters in Italy

     Mike - the subject is re-stated - it should have read 'inferior quality leading to mechanical failure'. - Yes I mentioned TGB, but it was to point out that the variator is not made by Piaggio. They do however have to take responsibility. No 'soft' landing I'm afraid - call it rubbish, inferior quality, crap or anything you like - the point is - it doesn't do the job it's supposedly designed to do. It also means I have the option of not buying another Piaggio! Results Mike - that's what we pay for and expect. No one on the maker's side is going to admit to selling inferior goods at the point of sale. Obviously the Italians know their scooters - that's why it's bottom of the list. On the optimistic side of things - It looks as though my pursuit of a scooter holy grail goes on .  

  • 11-19-2011 08:42 PM In reply to

    Re: Best selling scooters in Italy

    Tony. I never like to hear about other's misfortune but stuff does fail from time to time. Bushing failure or pulley failure?  Is it all fixed now?

    The larger quasar engines are an evolution of the smaller capacity units so CVT has to transmit more power through a similar component, that may be a factor.

    I have seen many worn out (polished and wavy) variator sheaves at my local Honda dealer so maybe they have to be considred as a consumable. More so on smaller scooters than your X7. 

    Also begs the question of course where/who makes Malossi/Polini et al variators? Not Malossi or Polini I'll wager.

     

  • 11-19-2011 09:16 PM In reply to

    Re: Best selling scooters in Italy

    funnily enough just been reading about Dellorto SI carburetors for large frame Vespas . They are now made under license by Spaco in India & apparently not off the same quality they use to be

    Si ‘Thi’ later
  • 11-20-2011 12:17 PM In reply to

    Re: Best selling scooters in Italy

     Thanks for youre sympathy Mike but I'm afraid I cannot accept "stuff failing from time to time". Yes the variator is working now (like riding a different bike - very smooth). I cleaned, machined and aligned everything (which should have been un-necessary) just to satisfy my own curiosity. I have ordered a Dr Pullery 9 roller variator as a replacement in the hope that it will be of a better quality. The point is though that it should not happen. When taking into consideration that a. this bike was purchased new and b. this is the third 'correction' in 6000 kms. For only twice the price one can buy a small car with all the bells and whistles, 5 year warranty etc. The standard of the average scooter is, in my opinion not acceptable for the money. I do not wish to pay for an inferior product. Maybe you have done us all a favour by showing what other people buy.  Cheers.

  • 11-20-2011 01:09 PM In reply to

    Variator

    Tony,

    As a "hobby" I sell J Costa variators in Thailand that is part of my curiosity. I have only sold one Piaggio 250 unit from which I have heard nothing bad yet. Mostly they are PCX so i have a passing interest in variators any other comments are from hard knocks and age. I was not aware until your post about TGB making variators I thought they were "just another: Taiwanese scooter company. I knew Union Material aka Dr. Pulley make variators but not TGB. Sadly outsourcing seems to be part of the modern world and mostly everyone in share price/quarterly performance driven corporate world is trying to save money rather than improve the product. Car manufacturers may be under closer scrutiny as far a quality goes that scooter ones. I know I watched a progeam one about how long and how much testing  BMW cars go through before release and I am sure that holds for all of them. Scooters?

    As a side note Tiger/PGO G-max 150's are being sold off cheap here so I may take the plunge, for a project as my mileage will be very modest. 

     

  • 11-20-2011 07:52 PM In reply to

    • johnwf
    • Top 200 Contributor
    • Joined on 12-04-2009
    • Canberra
    • Posts 150

    Re: Variator

     As far as I am aware, TGB (Taiwan Golden Bee) make a range of vehicles as well as being a specialist component manufacturer,  including making transmission components.  I too was surprised the first time I inspected the clutch in my 2001 model Italjet Dragster 180 - yep transmission components stamped TGB.  The Dragster has a modified motor, I give it heaps, not one problem with the transmission so must be of reasonable quality.  It is not unusual for a manufacturer to import specialist components rather than go to the trouble of designing and making those components.  Wonder where your brakes and electrical components are made for instance.

  • 11-20-2011 08:27 PM In reply to

    Re: Variator

    From our experience, I haven't seen any issues with TGB parts mechanically.  Electrically we've seen a few problems, but not mechanically.  A lot of the Taiwanese built scooters are structurally very, very sound - Kymco, SYM, PGO and TGB - though when they start going offshore I've been less impressed with the quality.

    If you've ever been to Italy you'll understand why big wheels are popular.  The roads there are shithouse.  Full of potholes, and plenty of cobbles to keep things interesting in the wet.  The big wheeled Honda's are, if I remember correctly, made in Italy too, so they probably get over any issue about buying foreign goods.  And being Honda, the quality will certainly be up there.

    I suspect that the main reason that the bigger Honda scooters don't sell well in Aus is 1) the apparent dislike for big wheeled scooters and 2) you've got to buy one from a Honda dealer who appear for the most part somewhat disinterested.  Sure, they'll stock a few Leads and Todays, cos they don't cost much, and the maxi's because they are kind of, nearly a motorbike, but a serious scooter...  I'm sure that your average Honda salesman would rather cut off his arm than have to actually talk to a prospective customer about one of these.  And you could never fall in love with one.



    Ace Scooters - practitioners to the scooter addicted.

    www.acescooters.com.au
  • 11-20-2011 08:31 PM In reply to

    Re: Variator

      I'm sure that your average Honda salesman would rather cut off his arm than have to actually talk to a prospective customer about one of these. And you could never fall in love with one.

    Wink Is that the salesman or the Honda Stick out tongue

    Si ‘Thi’ later
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