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Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

Last post 07-30-2015 05:11 PM by HB-Zip50. 58 replies.
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  • 06-14-2015 04:38 AM In reply to

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    vortexau:
    Oh, and that engine is diesel.

     

    http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/audi-creates-green-e-diesel-fuel-future-using-just-carbon-dioxide-water-1498524

    Aprilia Sportcity 2006,
    recently crashed badly, might replace or buy a car!
  • 06-14-2015 09:46 AM In reply to

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    Hi everyone,

    Thanks for the replies. Getting back to the question; Has anyone ridden the Honda 700N ???

    Just quickly, my car is a manual, but when driving a car, you don't have to be AS alert as compared to riding a bike. If I was in a corner and I got the gear wrong, it's nothing. If on a bike you got a gear wrong, iit's potentially dangerous. Gears are just one more distraction when already having to be super alert. At least with an automatic, your always in the right gear. The only pity is that there aren't more automatic motorbikes on the market.

    Always wanting more power...
  • 06-14-2015 12:39 PM In reply to

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    Scootaguy:

    Hi everyone,

    Thanks for the replies. Getting back to the question; Has anyone ridden the Honda 700N ???

    Just quickly, my car is a manual, but when driving a car, you don't have to be AS alert as compared to riding a bike. If I was in a corner and I got the gear wrong, it's nothing. If on a bike you got a gear wrong, iit's potentially dangerous. Gears are just one more distraction when already having to be super alert. At least with an automatic, your always in the right gear. The only pity is that there aren't more automatic motorbikes on the market.

    Why don't you get something like a Kawasaki Z300 with a slipper clutch (+ABS) then if you do snick it down to many gears you will be safe . Then after you have learnt to ride that then the world will be open to ride anything you like

  • 06-14-2015 03:24 PM In reply to

    • vortexau
    • Top 75 Contributor
    • Joined on 10-25-2008
    • Plainland Q, on the Warrego Hwy
    • Posts 462

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    Scootaguy:

    Hi everyone, . . .

    Just quickly, my car is a manual, but when driving a car, you don't have to be AS alert as compared to riding a bike. If I was in a corner and I got the gear wrong, it's nothing. If on a bike you got a gear wrong, iit's potentially dangerous. Gears are just one more distraction when already having to be super alert. At least with an automatic, your always in the right gear. The only pity is that there aren't more automatic motorbikes on the market.

    I suspect a major reason fot the lack of there being"more automatic motorbikes on the market" is that there just isn't enough demand for more.  Motorcyclists tend to be very traditional - wanting motorcycles to solely change very -- very -- gradually.  It took a period of years for the Kickstart Pedal to disappear after electric starting was fairly normal.  With the automobile, it'd be difficult to pickout a model that still retained the Hand Crank once Self Starters were commonplace.

    I never found changing gear to be "one more distraction" or not being in the most optimum ratio at any time "potentially dangerous" during my 48 years on the road.  Truth-to-tell, I did start out on an Auto-Clutch and then taught myself clutch control on a Piaggio Ape (which was more of a challenge for matching engine-speed to clutch takeup, although had the advantage of being on three-wheels during this learning period).

    Still, since I'd already mastered rudimentry clutch-control, I then found no great challenge in adapting to a 125cc (oil-mix) Two-Stroke motorcycle with four-speed gearbox.

    Once the basics are mastered, finding oneself in the wrong ratio (or no ratio) at any particular time just results in a snuffed engine, or an over-revving one.  In the FIRST example its more being red-faced than placed in harm's way, and the other oft results in a gear-clash and lurch as the needed change is rushed through.

     

    Well, motor scooters & maxi-scooters are in a similar market to automobiles classed as Saloons or limousines so there is little surprise in their CVT ratio selection.  Traditional motorcycles can be classed as similar to sportscars so there is usually no objection to their full-manual ratio control.  Cruiser-class motorcycles retain full-manual gear-changing because style-wise they try to mimic obsolete and classic/veteran motorcycles - --- my Honda Shadow VT750 of 2008 even lacked a Clock display; so unlike the preceding Yamaha YP400 Majesty & the present Suzuki Burgman Exec

    __________________
    Marty McFly:
    Does it run like on, on regular unleaded gasoline?
    Dr. Emmett L. Brown:
    Unfortunately, no. It requires something with a little more kick . . . plutonium!
  • 06-14-2015 03:53 PM In reply to

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    vortexau:

    With the automobile, it'd be difficult to pickout a model that still retained the Hand Crank once Self Starters were commonplace.

    Russian Ladas came equipped with a hand crank well into the eighties, at least... and it probably came in handy more often than you'd expect, with their winters and all...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsGUoljkrDE

     

     

  • 06-14-2015 04:17 PM In reply to

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    ferrix:

    vortexau:

    With the automobile, it'd be difficult to pickout a model that still retained the Hand Crank once Self Starters were commonplace.

    Russian Ladas came equipped with a hand crank well into the eighties, at least... and it probably came in handy more often than you'd expect, with their winters and all...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsGUoljkrDE

    Yep i had a 1979 LADA in the UK had to use the starting handle when i left the lights on camping . Also was handy to turn the motor when changing the points doing the timing or checking the valve clearanceYes

     

     

  • 06-16-2015 11:39 AM In reply to

    • vortexau
    • Top 75 Contributor
    • Joined on 10-25-2008
    • Plainland Q, on the Warrego Hwy
    • Posts 462

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    Few would dispute the conclusion that Soviet Bloc automobiles (roughly from the 50s to the wall coming down) were far from being shining examples of automobiles pushing the boundaries of auto design!?!

    Soviet Bloc two-stroke automobile

    Wartburg (car)

    "From the 1950s, Wartburgs had a three-cylinder two-stroke engine with only seven major moving parts (three pistons,  three connecting rods and one crankshaft).

    The engine was enlarged to 992 cc in 1962 and a completely new body was manufactured after 1966. This version, the 353, was sold as the Wartburg Knight in several countries, including the UK, where the estate model was sold as the Tourist. It remained on sale until 1976, by which time nearly 20,000 had been sold. This marked the end of right-hand drive Wartburgs, but left-hand drive versions continued to be imported to the UK and at least one model was converted to right-hand drive.

    Also, in 1966, the gearbox gained synchromesh on all speeds and was designed to freewheel as a fuel efficiency and engine protection measure, which meant that the car did not benefit from engine braking.  Because the engine was a two stroke unit, it relied on the passage of the petrol mixture (two-stroke) oil and petrol, at a ratio of 1:50) to lubricate the engine. With the freewheel device disabled, the engine could be starved of lubricant and seize on long down-hill runs unless the throttle was opened briefly from time to time. Nevertheless, disengaging the freewheel device was recommended to give engine braking in snowy or icy conditions.

    The engine of the car was with 50, 55 or 57 HP (depending on the year of production and the carburettor type). Fuel economy was barely acceptable for run-about driving.
    "

    Trabant

    "The Trabant is a car that was produced by former East German auto maker VEB Sachsering Automobilewerke Zwickau in Zwickau, Saxony.  It was the most common vehicle in East Germany, and was also exported to countries both inside and outside the Eastern Bloc. It was advertised as having room for four adults and luggage in a compact and durable shell; and being relatively fast.

    Due to its outdated and inefficient two-stroke engine (which produced poor fuel economy compared to its low power output and thick, smoky exhaust), and production shortages, the Trabant was regarded with derisive affection as a symbol of the extinct former East Germany and of the fall of the Eastern Bloc.  This is due to the fact that in former West Germany, many East Germans streamed into West Berlin and West Germany in their Trabants after the opening of the Berlin Wall in 1989. It was produced for nearly 30 years with almost no significant changes.

    Since the engine did not have an oil injection system, two-stroke oil had to be added to the 24-litre (6.3 U.S. gal; 5.3 imp gal) fuel tank every time the car was filled up, at a 50:1 or 33:1 ratio of fuel to oil. Gas stations of the time, in countries where two-stroke engines were common, served premixed gas-oil mixture from the pump. Today, owners carry a container of two-stroke oil in the car for this purpose. Because the car lacked a fuel pump, the fuel tank had to be placed above the motor in the engine compartment so that fuel could be fed to the carburetor by gravity; a trade-off of this design was an increased fire risk in front-end accidents. Earlier models had no fuel gauge; a dipstick was inserted into the tank to determine how much fuel remained.
    "

    The 50 worst cars of all time: 1975 Trabant

    "This is the car that gave Communism a bad name. Powered by a two-stroke pollution generator that maxed out at an ear-splitting 18 hp, the Trabant was a hollow lie of a car constructed of recycled worthlessness (actually, the body was made of a fiberglass-like Duroplast, reinforced with recycled fibers like cotton and wood).

    Trabants smoked like an Iraqi oil fire, when they ran at all, and often lacked even the most basic of amenities, like brake lights or turn signals."

    My opinion is that the only country capable of exporting a poorer example of automotive technology (than the former East Germany) is North Korea.

    North Korean car badge

    Pyeonghwa has the exclusive rights to car production, purchase, and sale of used cars in North Korea. However, most North Koreans are unable to afford a car. Because of the very small market for cars in the country, Pyeonghwa's output is reportedly very low. In 2003, only 314 cars were produced even though the factory had the facilities to produce up to 10,000 cars a year.

    Car advertising in North Korea

    "Pyeonghwa is currently the only company in North Korea to advertise. A series of billboards and TV commercials have been made in an effort to show residents that their country is able to produce products such as motor vehicles. The ads may be aimed primarily at expatriate businessmen in Pyongyang, but Car and Driver magazine suggests that they are actually propaganda aimed at the local population, to make them believe that their country is economically successful.

    As my tour guide, appropriately named Kim, explained, no one buys a car in North Korea. They're given to people by the party, so that explains the profusion of the ubiquitous UAZ-469, a Russian 4x4 produced by Ulyanovsky Avtomobilny Zavod.

    Kim explained that since fuel is hard to come by, the supreme leader used his profound knowledge of combustion engines to develop proprietary technology that enables these large utility trucks to run on fuel produced from what looks like a heating stove mounted to the bed of the truck. The stove is constantly burning wood and coal producing carbon monoxide and hydrogen which is fed to the diesel engine."

    run from a heating stove in the back

    __________________
    Marty McFly:
    Does it run like on, on regular unleaded gasoline?
    Dr. Emmett L. Brown:
    Unfortunately, no. It requires something with a little more kick . . . plutonium!
  • 06-16-2015 01:07 PM In reply to

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    Devil IMHO the eastern bloc didn't need to be innovative with their vehicle design with a captive population they could sell whatever they produced . One company that did make an impact in racing was MZ with there two stroke machines designed by Walter Kaaden. The defection of Ernst Degner & selling MZ secrets to Suzuki started Japanese dominance in Two stroke race bikes. Lets not forget Skoda and the rear engined rally cars in the RAC rally winning the under 1300cc for 17 years running Big Smile

    Confused Now aren't we getting of the subject of automatic transmission ? Sad

  • 06-16-2015 03:04 PM In reply to

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    pyrah:

    Devil IMHO the eastern bloc didn't need to be innovative with their vehicle design with a captive population they could sell whatever they produced . One company that did make an impact in racing was MZ with there two stroke machines designed by Walter Kaaden. The defection of Ernst Degner & selling MZ secrets to Suzuki started Japanese dominance in Two stroke race bikes. Lets not forget Skoda and the rear engined rally cars in the RAC rally winning the under 1300cc for 17 years running Big Smile

     

    Confused Now aren't we getting of the subject of automatic transmission ? Sad

    Tatra, another Czech car (that just happens to be behind the Skoda in the picture above) was rather innovative as well!

    yeah, we are getting off-topic a bit but what the heck - things are pretty quiet...

     

  • 06-16-2015 03:34 PM In reply to

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    Um Tatra off the top of my head i think rear engined air cooled V8 correct ?

  • 06-16-2015 05:03 PM In reply to

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    pyrah:

    Um Tatra off the top of my head i think rear engined air cooled V8 correct ?

    Yeah, that's the one: Tatra 603

    (that clip also features a Jawa motorcycle... and possibly radar gun? In 1962?!?)

     

  • 06-16-2015 05:34 PM In reply to

    • vortexau
    • Top 75 Contributor
    • Joined on 10-25-2008
    • Plainland Q, on the Warrego Hwy
    • Posts 462

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    pyrah:

    Devil  . . . . .

    Confused Now aren't we getting of the subject of automatic transmission ? Sad

     

    You said "of" but did you really mean "off"?

    Now when some folk talk of 'automatic transmission', they have 'automatic transmission' in mind while others have in mind transmissions which either (a) Don't require any manual clutch operation, or

    (b) Only require minimal clutch operation.

    Holding those ideas in mind let me make mention of the SECOND powered two-wheeler that I owned sometime about late 1968.

    CZ125

    The CZ125, that I bought to replace my Honda C65 Supercub, offered some innovative features. 

    Like many other motorcycles from the 50s & 60s, it had a full-coverage chaincase.

    But it was the Gearchange Pedal that had extra benefits not common outside CZ and Jawa brands.  For one thing, one simply pushed in the shaft of the gearchange, and then rotated it up & backwards.  At the 1:00AM position it then became a Kickstarter!

    Additionally to that, there was a connection to the clutch-disengagement mechanism on the shaft of the gearchange inside the casing. So, not only did one disengage the clutch with the lefthand grip lever, but up & down changes through the shiftlever also performed this function at the begining of the movement.

    Thus, if one's left hand had been hurt and was wrapped in bandages, one could still go riding and 'let-out' the clutch from stationary by slowly allowing the gearchange to return to its mid position after snicking it into FIRST gear.

    __________________
    Marty McFly:
    Does it run like on, on regular unleaded gasoline?
    Dr. Emmett L. Brown:
    Unfortunately, no. It requires something with a little more kick . . . plutonium!
  • 06-16-2015 05:57 PM In reply to

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    LOL great film clip Yes can't remember radar guns then in UK we had tripwire over a timed distance not that there were many of them even Big Smile

  • 06-16-2015 06:26 PM In reply to

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    You said "of" but did you really mean "off"?

    LOL yep i meant off very sorry if it confused you Stick out tongue

  • 06-16-2015 08:43 PM In reply to

    • vortexau
    • Top 75 Contributor
    • Joined on 10-25-2008
    • Plainland Q, on the Warrego Hwy
    • Posts 462

    Re: Fully Automatic CVT Transmission Motorcycles

    ferrix:

    pyrah:

    Um Tatra off the top of my head i think rear engined air cooled V8 correct ?

    Yeah, that's the one: Tatra 603

    (that clip also features a Jawa motorcycle... and possibly radar gun? In 1962?!?)

    The only Tatra models that I'm familar with (mostly due to the web and YouTube) are the big 8X8 813s:

    Tatra 813

    Truck trial Extreme Tatra 813 8x8 - Ride Backwards!

    __________________
    Marty McFly:
    Does it run like on, on regular unleaded gasoline?
    Dr. Emmett L. Brown:
    Unfortunately, no. It requires something with a little more kick . . . plutonium!
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